6 types of photos to share on social media

January 3, 2017
Sharing photos of your patients and staff is an effective way to market your practice.

Excerpted from page 44 of the November/December 2016 edition of AOA Focus.

The average consumer attention span is only eight seconds, but it takes our brain only a quarter of a second to process visual cues, according to Column Five, which specializes in creating visual content for companies.

"We are bombarded with images, words and sounds all day," says Megan Johnson, senior consultant at Williams Group, an eye care practice-management consulting firm. "Our attention spans are so limited that we don't have time to tell a story. Visual is the easiest way we can do it."  

Sharing photos of your patients and staff is an effective way to market your practice. Here are six types of photos to consider posting on social media:

  • Staff fitting a patient for new glasses, with patient's consent.
  • A child showing off his or her first pair of glasses, with a parent's or guardian's consent.
  • A baby wearing sunglasses to highlight UV awareness, with a parent's or guardian's consent.
  • Staff having fun at a community fundraiser.
  • Unique in-store or window displays.
  • A fashionable patient wearing his or her new high-end glasses, with the patient's consent.

Learn how you can use visual marketing techniques to help patients pay attention to their eye health on page 36 of the November/December 2016 edition of AOA Focus.

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