What’s your plan? 4 tips for emergencies

October 31, 2016
Putting emergency preparedness into practice is an essential part of good management.

Excerpted from page 49 of the October 2016 edition of AOA Focus.

"It doesn't matter how big or small you are—you should have a plan," says Jerry Sude, O.D., who has been studying and teaching practice management for more than 35 years to doctors of optometry and others.

Dr. Sude says putting emergency preparedness into practice is an essential part of good management.  

"We are in health care. I think it's important that we stay open when possible without jeopardizing the well-being of employees and patients," says Dr. Sude, who is president of Novus Clinic in the Akron, Ohio, area.  

Co-founder and chairman of OD Excellence LLC, based in Healdsburg, California, Dr. Sude has a few ideas for doctors thinking about whether their offices and staffs are prepared to handle emergencies, manmade or environmental.

His tips for doctors include:  

  • Carry disaster or loss of business insurance. AOAExcel® offers business owners insurance.
  • Install or maintain a security system. This should include an emergency hot button that can be pressed discreetly to notify the authorities. "The police will know it's an emergency," he says.  
  • Back up patient records stored in the office at a secure off-site location. "Your electronic medical record company will have options for you," Dr. Sude says.  
  • Outline emergency procedures in employee compliance manuals. Dr. Sude's office manual includes procedures for emergency drills for fires, for instance. "Everyone has to sign off that they have read the procedures."  
Related News

‘Surgical Saturday’ courses build your practice’s office-based laser skills

Have office-based laser procedures piqued your interest? Hear from four Optometry’s Meeting® speakers about how every member of your care team can benefit from this new educational programming.

Managing expectations: Telemedicine’s next step

Out of the pandemic’s disruption came a new level of comfort with technology, redefining our routines. From shopping and entertainment to health care, Americans’ expectations are changing—and industries are adapting. Telemedicine is at a pivotal moment. So how do providers meet patients’ expectations with sound, quality care?

As law evolves, Board of Trustees updates AOA Antitrust Compliance Policy

Violators of antitrust laws are potentially subject to criminal and civil penalties, as well as “immediate dismissal” from their position or relationship with the AOA, even if they were unaware their actions were not legal.