Clinical Practice Guidelines

As the AOA's Clinical Practice Guidelines are revised to meet the National Academies' of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine - Health and Medicine Division (NASEM) evidence-based standards, they will be listed here.

Consensus-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines 

Care of Patient with Amblyopia
1994 | Revised 1998 | Reviewed 2004

Care of the Patient with Primary Angle Closure Glaucoma
1994 | Revised 1998 | Reviewed 2001

Care of the Patient with Age-Related Macular Degeneration
1994 | Revised 1999 | Reviewed 2004

Care of the Adult Patient with Cataract
1995 | Revised 1999 | Reviewed 2004

Care of the Patient with Ocular Surface Disorders
1995 | 2nd Edition 2002 | Revised 2003 | Revised 2010

Care of the Patient with Strabismus: Esotropia and Exotropia
1995 | Revised 1999 | Revised 2010

Care of the Patient with Retinal Detachment and Related Peripheral Vitreoretinal Disease
1995 | Revised 1999 | Reviewed 2004

Care of the Patient with Visual Impairment (Low Vision Rehabilitation)
1997 | 2nd Edition 2007

Care of the Patient with Myopia
1997 | Revised 2006

Care of the Patient with Accommodative and Vergence Dysfunction
1998 | Revised 2010

Care of the Patient with Learning Related Vision Problems
2000 | Revised 2008

Have questions about the Clinical Practice Guidelines above? Send us an email.

Related News

‘Profits over patients cannot continue’ with VBMs; Texas testifies at health insurance hearing

As Texas defends its landmark law curbing vision benefit managers (VBMs), doctors of optometry testify at a hearing on the state’s health insurance market.

Kentucky attorney general holds Warby Parker accountable for its online vision test

Enduring advocacy by the Kentucky Optometric Association regarding retailer’s online eye test shows results as its state attorney general reaches settlement with Warby Parker that results in a fine announced May 10.

Next-gen optometry’s focus on independent practice

Preparing optometry students for practice autonomy is an imperative the AOA doesn’t take lightly, doubling down with partnering academic institutions for the profession’s future.