Practice Success Resources

When a law is passed related to the practice of optometry, it’s up to the regulatory process to define the details. Everything from how much Medicare pays for an eye exam to what, exactly, constitutes a prescription verification is determined by the regulatory agencies of the federal government.

Regulatory and coding

As a legislated profession, optometry is defined by the laws governing its practice. However, legislation rarely determines the finer points of the law. Staff and volunteers in the AOA Advocacy Group work with regulatory agencies every day to define the details that determine the impact of legislation on doctors of optometry and their patients. This happens in the form of official comment letters, meetings with federal officials, collaboration with others in the health care community, consultation with doctors regarding the precise details that go into a single Medicare code, the development of an optometric registry and much more.

Related News

What optometry’s advocates are championing at AOA on Capitol Hill

Learn about the priority federal issues that hundreds of optometrists and optometry students will take to Capitol Hill as part of optometry’s single-largest annual advocacy gathering, April 14-16, and how you can join.

Representation matters in optometry

Although about 13% of the U.S. population is Black, they are woefully underrepresented in optometry. They represent about 2% of practicing doctors of optometry and a little over 3% of full-time students in optometry schools and colleges, according to studies. Black doctors of optometry seek to grow those numbers.

Making blurry vision clear

February is Low Vision Awareness Month. Take note of considerations for enhancing success with near magnification.