Contact Lens & Cornea

The Contact Lens & Cornea Section (CLCS) is a nationally recognized segment of the AOA. Members of CLCS include eye care professionals and optometry students who are dedicated to furthering their understanding in the field of contact lenses, cornea, diagnosis and treatment of anterior segment disease, refractive surgery, and related technologies.

CLCS membership application

By joining the CLCS, we serve you—our member—by providing timely clinical education, representation with state and national government agencies and a recognized and trusted voice to the public for information on contact lenses, anterior segment management and refractive technologies. We provide you timely clinical education through our comprehensive monthly e-newsletter. The CLCS newsletter is recognized as a leading e-publication in the eye care field today. With our talented board of contributing writers and editors, the newsletter delivers you the latest information on contact lens and refractive surgery technologies, clinical management and practice management strategies for you and your patients.

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Contact lens

2019-2020 CLCS Council

Chair
Melissa Barnett, O.D., Sacramento, CA
Immediate Past Chair
Jason Compton, O.D., New York, NY
Chair Elect
Paul O. Velting, O.D., Morton, Illinois
Vice Chair
Mile Brujic, O.D., Bowling Green, Ohio
Secretary
Renee Reeder, O.D., Betsy Layne, Kentucky
Council Member
Melanie Frogozo, O.D., San Antonio, TX

CLCS Awards

The Dr. Donald R. Korb Award is given by the American Optometric Association (AOA) Contact Lens and Cornea Section (CLCS) in recognition of an individual who has been a true innovator and  leader in the field of contact lenses and anterior segment disease.
The recipient of this award has demonstrated the following:

  1. Has propelled the profession's knowledge base through novel research or lifelong education to other professionals in the field of contact lenses and anterior segment anomalies.
  2. Has made a major developmental impact on the profession through an innovative device or educational breakthrough.
  3. Has made a positive effect on the way practitioners manage their patients with anterior segment anomalies.

The Dr. Rodger Kame Award is given by the AOA CLCS in recognition of a section member who  has been a true innovator and leader in the field of contact lenses and anterior segment disease.

The recipient of this award has demonstrated the following:

  1. Has unselfishly given service to the section during the past year(s) above what is normally expected.
  2. Has made a positive impact on fellow practitioners in the eye care field.

The Achievement Award is given by the AOA CLCS in recognition of outstanding contribution to the optometric profession in the area of contact lenses and eye care. Prior to 1992, this award was known as the Person of the Year Award.

The recipient of this award has demonstrated the following:

  1. Has shown a long-term contribution in the advancement and propagation of knowledge in the field of contact lenses or eye care.
  2. Has taught selflessly in the area of contact lenses or eye care for a number of years and has contributed to the clinical, academic, and/or research education of students, interns, residents, or clinicians.
  3. Has made significant and unique contributions in the development of instruments, in the area of contact lenses or eye care, for the eye care practitioner.
  4. Has made a significant and unique contribution in the management programming for the improvement of contact lens practice.
  5. Has contributed and shared his or her knowledge with his or her fellow practitioners for the benefit of contact lenses and eye care for a number of years.

The Luminary Award for Distinguished Practice is given in recognition of a distinguished clinical  practitioner who has developed a contact lens practice and who tirelessly contributes to the  development of others.

The recipient of this award has demonstrated the following:

  1. Is a member of both the AOA and the CLCS.
  2. Is in a clinical contact lens practice setting.
  3. Has demonstrated his or her "giving back" to optometry through the education of other practitioners (writer, lecturer, volunteer, mentorship, etc.).
  4. Has demonstrated a long-standing contribution and shared knowledge with fellow practitioners for the betterment of contact lens practice and eye care.

The Dr. "Uncle Frank" Fontana Award is given in honor of Frank D. Fontana, O.D., a founder of the CLCS, contact lens pioneer, and friend and mentor to many.

The recipient of this award has demonstrated the following:

  1. Is a member of both the AOA and the CLCS.
  2. Shows a passion for educating patients and colleagues about contact lens technology and be an advocate for changing patient's lives through healthy contact lens use.
  3.  Has demonstrated his or her "giving back" to optometry through the education of other practitioners (writer, lecturer, volunteer, mentorship, etc.).
  4. Exemplifies the principles that Dr. "Uncle Frank" Fontana did so seamlessly in the areas of mentoring students and colleagues, promoting optometric multidisciplinary care and advocating for the advancement of the contact lens/optometric profession.

To submit a nomination for any of the above awards, please email clcs@aoa.org and include the nominee's name, contact information and a brief description of nominee's qualifications.

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